Literacy as a National Priority

 

 

SCALE hosted our fifth annual Read. Write. Act. Virtual Conference on November 1st–3rd 2012, focusing on the theme of “Literacy as a National Priority.” This year we created a new conference format. We decided to host the first two days of the conference virtually, and host a networking lunch and panel discussions on the last day. We love the virtual conference format, but we wanted to provide an opportunity for face-to-face interaction & networking.

Over 88 participants registered to attend presentations by university faculty, literacy program directors, student leaders, graduate students, and staff for both local and national service organizations.

Presenters

“Thanks for the opportunity! You guys have the virtual conference model down – simple and seamless—keep up the great work!” -Presenter

Twenty presentations were chosen from proposals submitted to SCALE’s national call for presenters. Virtual conference topics included Adult Education, Advocacy Tools, English Language Learners, Literacy Practices, Tutoring, Volunteer Management, and Health Literacy. The two panels on Saturday featured elected officials and education professionals from around North Carolina discussing how to effectively promote literacy as national priority.

Participants

“Brainstorming strategies with other participants during interactive parts of presentations was one of the best parts of the conference!” -Participant

People from over 50 organizations registered for 2012’s conference representing 14 states and 2 countries. Attendees included college student tutors, faculty, community partners, and AmeriCorps members.

Panelists

  • Mark Dorosinis Managing Attorney at the UNC Center for Civil Rights.
  • Heidi Carter Chairwoman of the Durham Public Schools (DPS) Board of Education
  • William G. Ingram President of Durham Technical Community College
  • Dr. Ingram Trustee of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools’ Commission on Colleges
  • Alice Denson Executive Director of the Orange County Literacy Council
  • Back to School: Baby Boomers in the Classroom
  • Women Reading for Education, Affinity & Development (WREAD): A Semi-Structured Reading Discussion Group for Black Female Adult Literacy Students with Histories of Trauma
  • Bridging the Generations: Teaching Reading and Writing to Generation Z
  • Husky Reads – Promoting literacy and healthy habits in preschool-aged children from underserved populations using a Service-Learning approach
  • America Reads: A Strive to Enhance Children’s Language Learning and Reading
  • Faces of HOPE
  • Project L.I.F.T. Common Assessment Platform

Back to School: Baby Boomers in the Classroom

Jonathan Rich, University of Georgia

Higher education is currently experiencing a demographic shift as Americans begin to retire and transition back into the classroom to pursue additional degrees or study topics of interest. Many seniors attend community colleges or technical schools in order to satisfy their propensity towards lifelong learning. However, a growing number of seniors prefer to attend classes in traditional academic settings. This presentation explores the experiences of students from the Baby Boomer generation as they transition back to the classroom at a traditional Southeastern university. This presentation attempts to shed light on both the motivations that inspire Boomers to return to class at traditional universities and the process by which they are integrated back into a classroom setting after many decades of absence. The findings relate to issues of diversity on campus, lifelong learning, and learning in retirement.

Keywords: Adult Literacy, Diversity, Policy, Older learners, Lifelong Learning

View this poster.

 


Women Reading for Education, Affinity & Development (WREAD): A Semi-Structured Reading Discussion Group for Black Female Adult Literacy Students with Histories of Trauma

Jaye Jones, University of Chicago

This poster will describe Women Reading for Education, Affinity & Development (WREAD), a reading discussion group geared toward Black female adult literacy students with self-defined histories of trauma. WREAD was an outgrowth of research identifying links between trauma, women’s struggles with literacy, and the need to be conscious of emotional health concerns in adult education classrooms. Critical literacy, Black feminist and relational cultural theoretical principles were aligned with specific texts focused on Black women’s experiences with trauma and community-based activities that broadened learning as well as evaluation measures that detailed learners’ educational and personal development. The fact that a majority of participants improved their reading scores, developed more affirming visions of themselves and cultivated supportive relationships with one another illustrates that creating an intervention where they could learn, process their feelings and connect with others can result in positive outcomes.

Keywords: Adult Literacy, Diversity, Emotionally Responsive Educational Practices

View this poster.

 


Bridging the Generations: Teaching Reading and Writing to Generation Z

Brittany Clark, Longwood University

In a world controlled by Facebook, Twitter, and texting, how can we expect our students to want to do something as “old fashioned” as read a book? How can we connect what they already know how to do best to what they need to know how to do? This poster gives educators practical strategies to not only assess student learning using modern technology and culture, but to bridge the generational gap in a way that fosters a lifelong love of reading.

Keywords: Assessment/Evaluation, Technology & Literacy

View this poster.

 


Husky Reads – Promoting literacy and healthy habits in preschool-aged children from underserved populations using a Service-Learning approach

Caitlin Moore, University of Connecticut, Center for Public Health and Health Policy

The Husky Reads program, named after the University of Connecticut’s canine mascot, provides a service learning opportunity to UCONN students and helps develop community partnerships. Since 1994, University of Connecticut students have delivered interactive nutrition education integrated with literacy activities in pediatric and Women Infant and Children (WIC) clinics, and in preschools throughout Connecticut. Funded by the USDA SNAP-Ed (funding:FNS # 4CT430420), Husky Reads promotes literacy in preschool-aged children from underserved populations and incorporates basic nutrition and health related topics into each lesson. All lesson materials, such as children’s books, games/craft activities, feature nutrition themes to promote healthy eating and each lesson is accompanied with a healthy snack to sample. For preschoolers, reading books each week with the UConn students, Husky Readers, helps promote reading as a fun activity. As the story characters come alive and children sample new foods, the Husky Readers encourage the children to make healthy choices.

Keywords: Child Literacy, Community Partnership, Service-Learning

View this poster.

 


America Reads: A Strive to Enhance Children’s Language Learning and Reading

Emily Perkins, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, America Reads

In my poster I captivate the importance of the program, America Reads. America Reads strives to help at-risk children become more confident and avid readers. I explain how literacy is important because avid readers have larger vocabularies and world knowledge. Without these skills, adults have a higher chance of living in poverty and a lower chance of obtaining employment. I want everyone to see and understand the importance of the program America Reads, and encourage anyone to get involved in it.

Keywords: Child Literacy, Community Partnership, Service-Learning

View this poster.

 


Faces of HOPE

Julia Hah, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Language Partnership (CLaP)

Faces of HOPE illustrates the mission and goals of Carolina Language Partnership (CLaP) at UNC. It also presents our Project selected for CLaP this year– both advocating education opportunities of HOPE to our tutees on UNC campus and to the students in San Antonio Sodzil, Yucatan, Mexico.

Keywords: Adult Literacy, Child Literacy, Community Partnership

View this poster.

 


Project L.I.F.T. Common Assessment Platform

Kelly Freiheit, Supporting Leader Emily Jukich, Under the mentorship of Denise Watts, Project LIFT

This poster examines a project within the Charlotte-Mecklenberg School system that aimed to:

  • Create a common assessment platform for third and eight grade literacy in Project L.I.F.T.
  • Establish zone PLCs for teachers reflect on assessment data
  • Foster collaboration and consistency among teachers across schools in the L.I.F.T zone
  • Achieve a higher level of success for students in the L.I.F.T. zone
  • Close the literacy gap

Keywords: Literacy Gap, Assessment/Evaluation

View this poster.

  • Parents and Caregivers Role in the Development of Early Literacy Skills
  • Dyslexia: What it is and how to help
  • The Role of Nursing Schools in Community Based Health Promotion and Research
  • The Underrepresentation of Minority Students in Gifted Education
  • Visual Writing for Adult Learners
  • Unrolling the Book: Comprehending the Big Picture
  • Creating A Haitian Creole Literacy Project
  • Online Learning Made Simple: A Guided Tour
  • Promoting Literacy in Schools and Communities through Service-Learning
  • The Four Components of Reading
  • Beyond Look Cover Write
  • DESIGN AS NATURE: The Environment as Inspiration for 21st Century Learning
  • Trial of T.J.
  • Vocabulary Development for Workplace Communications
  • RALF: A Model for Improving Visual Literacy, Diminishing Gullibility
  • Role of Formative/Summative Reading Assessments in Predicting Academic Success
  • Teaching Basic Skills in a Way that is Empowering, Motivating, and Relevant
  • Critical Literacy as a Global Imperative
  • Health Literacy in the ESL Classroom

Parents and Caregivers Role in the Development of Early Literacy Skills

Alana Tutwiler, Jacksonville Job Corps Center

This presentation will provide strategies for engaging parents and caregivers in the development of early literacy skills of the children in their care. The focus will be on providing simple, easy to teach/learn skills that even parents with limited education can implement, using items found in the child’s natural environment. The target audience would be early intervention specialists, child care providers, early learning organizations, and pre-K/primary teachers and administrators.


Dyslexia: What it is and how to help

Dr. Kelli Sandman-Hurley, Dyslexia Training Institute

The participants in this workshop will learn what dyslexia is and what interventions work for those who struggle. We will also discuss how to assess for dyslexia and how to work with schools to help those diagnosed. Participants will have the opportunity to experience a simulation of dyslexia as well.


The Role of Nursing Schools in Community Based Health Promotion and Research

Crystal Shannon, Indiana University Northwest
Community-based health promotion (CBHP) is an important component of public health; and schools of nursing (SON) represent a valuable resource for CBHP. Chicago metropolitan SON and local community members discussed their practice of CBHP and community-based participatory research (CBPR) efforts. Results showed most SON participate in limited CBHP and CBPR activities. This presentation focuses on the role of nursing schools on positively impacting community based health.


The Underrepresentation of Minority Students in Gifted Education

Caitlin Farren, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
This presentation will focus on the reality of underrepresentation of minority students in gifted education.


Visual Writing for Adult Learners

Beth Hammett, College of the Mainland
This presentation looks at visual writing, the peer workshop approach to teaching adult learners basic writing skills. It includes activities, examples, and tips to help adult writers become successful communicators in today’s fast-paced society. It’s great for ESL/ELL and early learners, too! It includes extra resources, handouts, and more. N.B. This presentation follows NADE best practices for adult learners and National Writing Project guidelines.


Unrolling the Book: Comprehending the Big Picture

Dave Middlebrook, textmapping.org
Learn what the low-tech, ancient rolled book can do for reading instruction in the age of high technology. Learn how the unique attributes of this long-forgotten book form make it a powerful tool for teaching content and content-area-learning strategies. Discover how unrolled books engage students and help them see the big picture. Before viewing, please visit http://www.textmapping.org/workroom.html.


Creating A Haitian Creole Literacy Project

Julia Gandrud and Dianne Zimbabwe, University of Massachusetts at Boston
According to the 2002 UNESCO Institute for Statistics, 46.2% of men and 50% of women (defined as over the age of 15) are not literate in Haiti. In addition, while only 10% of Haitians are bilingual in French and Kreyol, almost all school instruction is in French. Therefore, the presenter hoped to create a trilingual literacy group in Providence, RI, focusing on writing down personal stories, children’s stories, and personal introductions, in each of these three relevant languages. This discussion is about the presenter’s experiences setting up an L1/L2/L3 adult literacy project for Haitian Americans in Providence, RI.


Online Learning Made Simple: A Guided Tour

Katie Bova, ProLiteracy
There are many resources for teaching and learning available online. How do you sort through the masses to find what is best for you and your students? Let a librarian help! In this workshop, you will take a guided tour through several FREE web-based resources for adult learners, tutors and instructors, and program managers. The session will feature online resources used in developing ProLiteracy’s Life Links Digital Literacy program. Life Links aims to help adults learn to use technology effectively to meet educational, work, and life goals, ultimately preparing learners to take full advantage of the information and resources available in our digital world.


Promoting Literacy in Schools and Communities through Service-Learning

Davida Gatlin, generationOn
Book drives are a time-honored way of sharing the gift of literacy, but are often de-contextualized and youth may be unclear about the lasting impact of their project. In this presentation, learn how using the strategy of service-learning can provide valuable learning opportunities and give meaning to book drives and other service projects that promote literacy. We will tour the generationOn and Learning to Give websites and show you how to access free standards-aligned K-12 service-learning and philanthropy education lesson plans, teacher resources and professional development. We will also introduce the generationOn Schools program and discuss best practices for engaging students in real-world learning through service.


The Four Components of Reading

Roberta Hawthorne & Micah Guindon, Reading Connections
In this presentation, participants will learn about the four components of reading: alphabetics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Learners may have varied strengths and weaknesses in these different areas and teaching them as separate components will help advance overall comprehension. The presenters will also provide sample lessons for each of the areas.


Beyond Look Cover Write

Dr. Lillian Fawcett, Cracking the ABC Code
This presentation focuses on an effective multisensory spelling strategy which is based on best practices highlighted in current research regarding literacy acquisition and memory retention research. Participants will be given an overview of the research underlying the strategy, have the strategy explained in a step by step process with the theoretical basis of each step explained, and then have the opportunity to practice using the strategy. This multisensory strategy can be applied to any word.


DESIGN AS NATURE: The Environment as Inspiration for 21st Century Learning

Linda Keane, NEXT.cc/The School of the Art Institute of Chicago/University of WI Milwaukee
DESIGN AS NATURE introduces 21st century learning that introduces what design is, what design does, and why design is important. It offers the environment as inspiration for eco literacy and digital fluency through activities across nine scales- nano, pattern, object, space, architecture, neighborhood, urban, region, and world. DESIGN AS NATURE introduces informal learning as essential motivational support for new ways of communicating, creating and collaborating. It introduces a technology linked eco web of journeys (NEXT.cc) that integrates virtual field trips, museums, institutions and contemporary practices. DESIGN AS NATURE shares information, object, experience and environment design opportunities for greening school curriculum, campuses and communities. Design As Nature empowers eco literate and digitally fluent place based projects.


Trial of T.J.

Katherine Cohen, Greenberg Elementary
This is a presentation of an end of novel unit performance assessment developed by the presenter for the end of the book Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. It has been previously presented and well received at the School District of Philadelphia’s ESOL Expo. Through cooperative learning and scaffolding, English Language Learners and students with IEPs were able to understand and complete grade level literacy work.


Vocabulary Development for Workplace Communications

Michelle Walker-Wade, New Haven Adult School
We know vocabulary development is a primary aspect of literacy for; yet many educators struggle to find ways to help adult learners develop the vocabulary needed for the world of work. This workplace literacy workshop will provide techniques and instructional strategies for developing and delivering workplace vocabulary lessons in a way that is engaging and relevant. We will look at methods for taking vocabulary lessons beyond the knowledge and comprehension levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy, and into the higher levels of application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.


RALF: A Model for Improving Visual Literacy, Diminishing Gullibility

Mindy Keller-Kyriakides, Capella, and AnnMarie Dearman, Florida Atlantic University
Today’s young people are bombarded with images, videos, and other visual media. Helping them navigate this environment is key in helping offset vulnerability and manipulation. This presentation provides participants with a look into strategies for teaching visual literacy, through: Emphasizing Rhetorical Analysis: reality television, commercials/promotional videos, blogs/posts, and the new pathos appeal: fear-manipulation and the OMG! factor Examining Prevalent Logical Fallacies: slippery slope, hasty generalization, appeal to authority, argument of ignorance


Role of Formative/Summative Reading Assessments in Predicting Academic Success

Dr. David W. Hickey, Cincinnati State
The popularity of formative feedback assessments and their promise of improving student achievement in the K-12 environment continues to flourish. This session will explore how the gap can be bridged between formative and summative assessments. Specifically, the effectiveness of the Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) as a predictive instrument of academic success will be addressed. The presenter will offer considerations as to whether DRA results are differentially-related to students categorized as below, at, or above grade level. Research suggests integrating the DRA as an intervention indicator to be integrated as part of a formative feedback system used to identify students who may be at risk of failing high-stakes state assessments. Other instructional delivery models promoting student achievement using formative feedback tools will be reviewed.


Teaching Basic Skills in a Way that is Empowering, Motivating, and Relevant

Cynthia Peters, World Education
The national election is featured in the news. How can you bring it into your classroom in a lively, participatory way? Many students are alienated from voting or may not have the right to vote. How can you address that and support students to think about democracy in the U.S.? In this dynamic, session, Cynthia Peters will model lessons that teach basic skills while investigating key issues around the history and politics of voting. Participants will have the opportunity to try out exercises and will leave with multiple ready-to-use lesson plans that teach reading, writing, numeracy, and critical thinking. Participants will also become familiar with the new audio feature of The Change Agent and learn how they can use this tool to help learners improve their reading fluency and English language skills.


Critical Literacy as a Global Imperative

Stacey Duncan, Eileen Davis, Amy Dickinsen & Kelly Henderson, New Mexico State University
This presentation focuses on the global imperative of critical literacy for a participatory democracy within community and classroom contexts. As a panel we will define our understanding of critical literacy, position it as a global human necessity of reflexive praxis, and the potentialities of localized applications. Our perspectives consider critical literacy as spaces for social justice allegiances in multiple ways: as ecoliteracy advocates in the Food Justice movement; how enacting critical literacy is experiential learning in the classroom for action; and using critical literacy to better integrate the classroom with community through cooperative learning.


Health Literacy in the ESL Classroom

MaryBeth Grewe, SCALE
In this interactive online session, we will discuss the concept of health literacy with a focus on finding ways to integrate health literacy practice into routine ESL activities. This session is relevant to ESL tutors, mentors, community health workers/volunteers and anyone interested in ideas for how to make health information more readily understandable/accessible to non-native English speakers.

Comments are closed.