With North Carolina Literacy Corps

Add NCLC info here.

With America Reads & CountsDuke ARAC (America Reads & Counts) Logo

The America Reads program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill prepares college students to work as literacy tutors for children in pre-k through fifth grades. The America Reads Challenge was a grassroots national campaign begun in 1997. It challenged every American to help all our children learn to read, including English Language Learners and students with disabilities. The program at UNC-Chapel Hill began in 1997 and has formed partnerships with five local schools and one daycare to support parents, teachers, and staff in helping children achieve their reading goals.

America Counts is a federal initiative created in 1997 to assist elementary through ninth-grade students in developing a stronger foundation in mathematics. While U.S. fourth graders perform above the international average, mathematical performance begins to decline in the middle grades, and U.S. students perform significantly below the international average by the end of secondary school. The America Counts program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill focuses on improving elementary and middle school mathematic performance and understanding by forming a supportive and dedicated partnership between a college tutor and elementary or middle school student.

President Clinton signs the America Reads legislation
President Clinton signs the America Reads legislation

Using federal work-study funds, the America Reads and Counts program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill places college student tutors in a community center, local middle and elementary schools to provide classroom support and individual attention to struggling and at risk students. The tutors provide consistent service to the sites by working with their learners at least twice a week in 40-minute sessions for 23 weeks during the academic year.

 

 

 

Through continued training, tutor supervision, evaluation and teacher collaboration, our America Reads and Counts program strives to:

  1. Increase the mathematics understanding of local pre-k through 8th grade students.
  2. Increase the reading levels of local children from pre-k to fifth grade.
  3. Increase university students’ involvement in the community.
  4. Strengthen the partnership between the university and the community

Internships at SCALE

The mission of the Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (SCALE) is to mobilize and support college students and campus-based programs to address the literacy needs of this country. At SCALE we believe that literacy is more than just reading and writing – literacy is also a tool for personal & social transformation and a vehicle for social justice. Through programs such as the America Reads & Counts program and the North Carolina Literacy Corps (NCLC), SCALE promotes a participatory, learner-centered approach to literacy in which power is shared among learners, volunteers, and community members.

SCALE supports literacy programming that includes Adult Basic Education, Youth Literacy and Mentoring, English Language Learning, and GED Preparation to name a few. Interns at SCALE have the opportunity to participate in one-to-one tutoring with elementary school students, develop trainings that address the needs of our partner organizations, and experience the day to day behind the scenes of a non-profit.  Interns can also work side by side with several of our community partners and provide support to our college students in the planning and execution of several of our annual events such as National Literacy Action Week (NLAW) and Global Youth Service Day (GYSD). As an intern at SCALE, you will be able to experience both direct and indirect service to your community and beyond and be able to experience the true meaning of service and the priceless rewards of change, no matter how small.

For an insider perspective, check out a blog excerpt from one of our America Reads tutors, Crystal Yuille, as she reflects on her time working with the program:

“…I’ve learned that the service we’re doing with the kids is not only important because it offers the kids a chance to improve their literacy skills. The program, offers something more valuable than that. It affirms to each of the kids involved that they are deserving of one-on-one personalized attention and mentorship. It shows them that there are people who are invested in their future and in their success. But it takes practice to prove that to the kids. Over time, I’ve learned that it requires a certain level of compassion; one that says I understand you’re having a bad day so let’s do an unexpected, fun, but still educational activity. And, it’s a type of compassion that says we’re going to decide on the rules together so we understand that we expect the best from each other. It’s about saying we’re going to work together, care about each other and get things done, even if it’s hard, and especially if it’s challenging.”